How Much Can You Sue for Discrimination at Work?

The law makes it very clear that employers cannot discriminate against their employees. If they do, they are opening themselves up to lawsuits.

If you believe you were discriminated against at work and now you want to sue your employer, it can be helpful to learn about how much you’ll possibly be able to receive.

What Kind of Damages Can Plaintiffs Pursue?

There are different ways of approaching damages for plaintiffs who sue for discrimination. Let’s say a plaintiff was not given a job promotion because her employer was discriminatory. If she is successful with her lawsuit, her employer may have to give her a promotion as well as any other benefits that come along with the job and pay her attorney’s fees, court costs, and expert witness fees.

Other damages include compensatory and punitive damages. These become relevant in cases where an employee experienced intentional discrimination based on their race, gender, religion, disability, sexual orientation, and whether or not they are pregnant. Compensatory damages will cover the out-of-pocket expenses a plaintiff had to pay for (such as clothing for new job interviews or medical expenses for therapy) and emotional harm they suffered from like loss of enjoyment of life. They could receive punitive damages if their employer was particularly reckless.

What Are the Limits on Damages?

Keep in mind that there are limits on compensatory and punitive damages depending on the size of a company. If there are 15-100 employees, the limit is $50,000, but if there are 101-200 employees, it’s $100,000. For companies with 201-500 employees, the limit goes up to $200,000, and it’s $300,000 if there are more than 500 employees.

Reaching Out to a Lawyer

If you were discriminated against at work, then contact the personal injury firm Gash & Associates. Gash & Associates help clients throughout Westchester County and we offer free consultations. Reach out today by calling (914) 328-8800.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn